Posted on 4 June 2015 by Anton Alipov

Last edited on 5 June 2015 by Anton Alipov

Categories: Art, History

Good Heavens of the Voynich Manuscript

The awkward drawings of the Voynich Manuscript are the subject of ongoing discussion. In most cases it is not clear what exactly is depicted. In the absense of plain-text labeling, we are left to search for patterns and for analogies with plain-text manuscripts of the respective era. The pattern that attracted my attention is found in the illustrations accompanying the works of Lyranus who lived in 14th century and was a famous commentator of the Bible.

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Posted on 5 April 2015 by Anton Alipov

Last edited on 8 December 2018 by Anton Alipov

Categories: Art, History

To Crack the Spell: Further Considerations Upon Voynich f116v

This article is based on two hypotheses about Voynich f116v: the "German" context of the VMS and the medieval spell being the major content of the folio in question. From this viewpoint, some parallels with contemporary 15th century manuscripts are examined and certain observations and ideas are disclosed to the reader.

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Posted on 15 March 2015 by Anton Alipov

Categories: Art, History

God's Thingum: On Voynich f116v, Line 0

In my 2014 article some evidence towards the German context of the VMS has been discussed. The present article develops this concept further, revealing some traces of carnival and vulgarity and the sad circumstance that the medieval Christian world has never been too Christian.

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Posted on 6 September 2014 by Anton Alipov

Category: Art

On Certain Undiscussed Marginalia in Voynich f1r

The first page (f1r) of the Voynich Manuscript (VMS) is distinguished with interesting marginalia which have been extensively discussed in the past. However, there seem to be more marginalia than hitherto discussed.

Looking at the space between the third and the fourth paragraphs of f1r, one can see faint traces of something that has seemingly been written there but was erased or otherwise partially destroyed afterwards. Were these writings made by Voynich himself to try his chemicals in this place before applying them to the bottom of the page?

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Posted on 17 August 2014 by Anton Alipov

Category: History

The Dorabella Cipher: Which Reproduction Is the Correct One?

The photograph of the famous “Dorabella cipher” recently published by the Elgar Birthplace Museum and Visitor Centre reproduces this cipher differently from the version that is usually discussed. Is it true that all these years researchers have been working with an incorrect reproduction?

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